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Kitchener council approves new anti-idling bylaw

The city says that move was made as part of it Community Climate Action Plan which is looking to reduce community-level greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent before 2050. Getty Images

Kitchener City Council has passed a new bylaw which will require drivers to turn their vehicles off if they have been idling for more than three straight minutes.

The city says that move was made as part of its Community Climate Action Plan which is looking to reduce community-level greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent before 2050.

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“Each of us has a role to play in building a healthier and more sustainable future for our City,” Councillor Margaret Johnson said in a statement.

“Idling creates unnecessary air pollution, emitting more than 40 hazardous pollutants into the air we breathe. Shutting off your engine, instead of idling, is one small step that has a big impact on our community, making it safer and more livable now and for future generations.”

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It will cost motorists who are caught breaking the law $75.

The rule is not without exceptions including ambulances in operational activities, vehicles such as tow trucks who are assisting in emergency and a vehicle running to provide power for other equipment or refrigeration.

Other exceptions include vehicles used in workshops, stuck in traffic, under service as well as armoured vehicles doing a drop-off or pick-up.

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Finally, vehicles working on farms for the city, region or utilities are also exempt.

In addition, extreme weather conditions will also earn drivers a pass as vehicles can idle when it is 27 degrees Celsius or below 5 degrees Celsius.

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